Veterans Day and Memorial Day

Veterans Day and Memorial Day – Here’s how they differ 2022

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Veterans Day and Memorial Day– Veterans Day and Memorial Day both honors the military community in the United States, but the two holidays serve different purposes and their origins are tied to two different wars.

Armistice Day was the original name for Veterans Day.

Veterans Day, observed every November, honors all who have served in the United States military.

The federal holiday is observed on November 11, the anniversary of the end of World War I in 1918.

A year later, for the first time, President Woodrow Wilson observed what was originally known as Armistice Day. However, it wasn’t until 1938 that Congress declared it an official federal holiday.

The holiday’s name was changed to Veterans Day in 1954 to honors veterans from all wars in which the United States has fought. The day is celebrated in France and other parts of Europe.

The holiday’s name was changed to Veterans Day in 1954 to honors veterans from all wars in which the United States has fought. In France and other parts of Europe, the day is still known as Armistice Day.

Veterans Day and Memorial Day

However, for several years, Veteran’s Day was observed in October.

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To ensure a long weekend for workers, the Uniform Holiday Act of 1968 moved the holiday from November 11 to the “fourth Monday in October.”

Veterans Day and Memorial Day

However, due to the significance of the holiday in commemorating the end of the war, President Gerald Ford returned it to its original November date in 1975.

Memorial Day was originally known as Decoration Day, according to history professor Matthew Dennis, and was observed on May 30.

It was the day when people decorated the graves of Civil War soldiers — both Union and Confederate — who died during the conflict.

It was first observed as Armistice Day on November 11, 1919, to commemorate the first anniversary of the end of World War I, which officially ended on the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” in 1918.

Veterans Day and Memorial Day

Congress called for an annual commemoration of the anniversary in 1926, and by 1938, it had become an official federal holiday. After a few decades, President Dwight D.

Eisenhower officially changed the name of the holiday from Armistice Day to Veterans Day in 1954.

The annual tradition of decorating fallen soldiers’ graves with flags and flowers is believed to have originated in Waterloo, N.Y. That tradition is still carried on today all over the country.

Almost a century later in 1971, Congress switched the official holiday to the last Monday in May, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Veterans Day: A Day to Remember All Those Who Have Served in the Military Veterans Day, a federal holiday observed on November 11,

is set aside to honors the 19.5 million men and women who have served in the United States military.

While it is important to thank all those who have served or are serving on a regular basis, it is especially important to show military members gratitude for their sacrifice on Veterans Day.

Here are some alternatives to simply saying “thank you for your service”:

1) Participate in a Veterans Day event.

2) Inquire about a veteran’s military service;

3) Fly the American flag in your home; and

4) Volunteer or donate to a military nonprofit such as the USO.

5) Read a book or watch a film about American military history.

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